Coming Soon to Academy Cinemas

Screening July 11th. Actor and filmmaker Sam Neill weaves portions of his own biography into an insightful, idiosyncratic and liberally illustrated analysis of New Zealand cinema — from its crude beginnings to the full flowering of technical and artistic achievement seen in the breakthrough films of Peter Jackson, Lee Tamahori, and Jane Campion. Made as part of the BFI's Century of Cinema series, it screened at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival to wide acclaim; The New York Times' Janet Maslin rated it a highlight of the series. It won Best Documentary at the 1996 TV Awards.

Encores including new Q&A! Opening July 15th. For sixty years, Queen Elizabeth II has met with each of her twelve Prime Ministers in a private weekly meeting. This meeting is known as The Audience. No one knows what they discuss, not even their spouses. Winner of the Best Actress Olivier Award®, The Audience sees Helen Mirren reprise her Olivier Award-winning performance as Queen Elizabeth II, following her Academy Award® win for the same role The Queen. Encore screenings of the original West End production of The Audience, captured live in London in 2013, feature an exclusive Q&A with Stephen Daldry and Helen Mirren.

Opening July 22nd. Acclaimed playwright Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare in Love, Arcadia, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead) returns to the National Theatre with his highly-anticipated new play The Hard Problem, directed by Nicholas Hytner (Othello, Hamlet, One Man, Two Guvnors). Hilary, a young psychology researcher at a brainscience institute, is nursing a private sorrow and a troubling question at work, where psychology and biology meet. If there is nothing but matter, what is consciousness? This is ‘the hard problem’ which puts Hilary at odds with her colleagues who include her first mentor Spike, her boss Leo and the billionaire founder of the institute, Jerry. Is the day coming when the computer and the fMRI scanner will answer all the questions psychology can ask? Meanwhile Hilary needs a miracle, and she is prepared to pray for one.

Opening August 5th. Academy Award® nominee Ralph Fiennes (The Grand Budapest Hotel, The English Patient, Oedipus at the National Theatre) plays Jack Tanner in this exhilarating reinvention of Shaw’s witty, provocative classic. A romantic comedy, an epic fairytale, a fiery philosophical debate, Man and Superman asks fundamental questions about how we live. Jack Tanner, celebrated radical thinker and rich bachelor, seems an unlikely choice as guardian to the alluring heiress, Ann. But she takes it in her assured stride and, despite the love of a poet, she decides to marry and tame this dazzling revolutionary. Tanner, appalled by the whiff of domesticity, is tipped off by his chauffeur and flees to Spain, where he is captured by bandits and meets The Devil. An extraordinary dream-debate, heaven versus hell, ensues. Following in hot pursuit, Ann is there when Tanner awakes, as fierce in her certainty as he is in his.

Opening August 8th. BAFTA winner and Academy Award® nominee Chiwetel Ejiofor (12 Years a Slave) takes the title role in this dynamic new production of one of English drama’s oldest plays, directed by the National Theatre’s new Director Rufus Norris (Broken, London Road). Everyman is successful, popular and riding high when Death comes calling. He is forced to abandon the life he has built and embark on a last, frantic search to recruit a friend, anyone, to speak in his defence. But Death is close behind, and time is running out. One of the great primal, spiritual myths, Everyman asks whether it is only in death that we can understand our lives. A cornerstone of English drama since the 15th century, it now explodes onto the stage in a startling production with words by Carol Ann Duffy, Poet Laureate, and movement by Javier De Frutos.

Screening August 15th. In 1920s and 1930s New Zealand, Janet Frame grows up in a poor family with lots of brothers and sisters. Already at an early age she is different from the other kids. She gets an education as a teacher but since she is considered abnormal she stays at a mental institution for eight years. Success comes when she starts to write novels.

Releasing 3rd September. Winner of the 2015 Sundance Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award, ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL is the story of Greg Gaines (Thomas Mann), an awkward high school senior whose mom forces him to spend time with Rachel - a girl in his class (Olivia Cooke) with whom he hasn't spoken to since kindergarten - who was just diagnosed with cancer. Current;y rated 81% fresh on rotten tomatoes ''Beautifully scripted and perfectly cast, Me & Earl & the Dying Girl is a coming-of-age movie with uncommon charm and insight.''

Screening September 19th. Recluse Smith (Sam Neill) is drawn into a revolutionary struggle between guerillas and right-wingers in New Zealand. Implicated in a murder and framed as a revolutionary conspirator, Smith tries to maintain an attitude of non-violence while caught between warring factions.

Screening October 17th. Toss is an 11-year old girl living on a remote hill country farm. While out with her father herding sheep, he falls and is killed. Ethan, a bearded stranger appears, carrying his body, and plants himself on the farm. Toss fears he’s Lucifer and is confused when he and her mother become lovers. It is through Ethan, however, that Toss comes to terms with her father’s death and the first stirrings of womanhood. Vincent Ward’s debut feature was the first NZ film selected for competition at Cannes; LA Times’ critic Kevin Thomas lauded it as “a work of awesome beauty”.

Screening November 21st. Thomas, Jack and Wayne are best mates. At night they're the Stickmen, who tour the Wellington pub scene playing pool with ever-increasing stakes. These peak when they enter a tournament run by vicious crime boss ‘Daddy'. Can they pocket the money and win the girls? Rothwell's first feature was a Kiwi take on the UK urban underbelly genre (Lock, Stock etc). "Smart, stylish and effortlessly entertaining" (Dominion Post) the film was a hit with the young male demographic and won several 2001 NZ Film and TV Awards (including best director, script, and actor).

Screening December 19th. Rain begins by evoking an idyllic kiwi summer. It's a 1970s beach holiday; Mum, Dad and the kids. Picture perfect. But, as the title hints, all is not sunny days at the bach. Beneath still waters Mum is drowning in drink, Dad is defeated, and 13-year-old Janey is awakening to a new kind of power. An adaptation of the eponymous Kirsty Gunn novel, Rain was director Christine Jeffs' widely acclaimed debut feature and saw her selected on Variety’s 2002 ‘Ten Directors to Watch’ list. Kevin Thomas in the LA Times acclaimed the film as, “an important feature debut.”

Did you miss Dragon Ball Z: Battle of Gods last year at Academy? We're bringing it back for two special screenings to go along with the newest DBZ film: Resurrection 'F.' Tickets to the Battle of Gods screenings are just $5! The Z-Fighters must contend with Lord Beerus, the God of Destruction. But it Can only takes a God to fight a God, and none of them are Gods - not even the Saiyans. But now there is hope, the creation of the Super Saiyan God. Will The Z-Fighters be able to defeat Lord Beerus?

Hot off the success of last year's Battle of Gods, Dragon Ball Z comes back to Academy Cinemas with the new film: Resurrection 'F!" PLUS, if you missed Battle of the Gods, we're giving you a two more chances to see it for just $5! One peaceful day on Earth, two remnants of Frieza`s army named Sorbet and Tagoma arrive searching for the Dragon Balls with the aim of reviving Frieza. They succeed, and Frieza subsequently seeks revenge on the Saiyans. (6/8 Screening in Japanese with English Subtitles. All other screenings are dubbed.)

Academy Cinemas is happy to welcome Doc Brown and Marty McFly into the present with a Back to the Future Double Feature! We`ll be playing the first two films starting at 6:30 for just $10!